Class Citizenship Project - Bonus Supplementary Activity

These activities encourage students to engage in their communities (school and neighborhood) and develop the skills, knowledge, and behavior to be responsible and contributing citizens.

In this activity, students participate in a class citizenship project. The purpose of these activities is to:

  • Help students understand the importance of citizenship and community
  • Encourage students to work as a team (with each other and/or members of the community)

There are four projects in this class citizenship activity:

Project #1: Classroom Elections

Area of Community Learning Teamwork Builds On Artifacts
Civic education Students work in teams to design and make “I voted” ribbons, create campaigns, draw posters, and write speeches.
  • Posters
  • Videos of speeches,
  • Election results charts,
  • Photos from their field trip to a local government office,
  • Reflection paragraphs.

Setup

  1. Hold classroom elections for classroom positions (e.g. president) or, to lessen the emphasis on personal competition, to vote for class party themes (e.g. space, pizza, etc. ).
  2. After the vote, create graphs and charts to communicate the results.
  3. Everyone gets an “I Voted” ribbon for voting in the classroom election.

Research

  1. Visit your town’s municipal office to learn about local government and to speak to councillors or other public officials about elections.
  2. Students can also research different government styles and historical elections on the computer.

Communication

Students create and ask questions for their field trip, deliver speeches, speak to classmates about important issues, and write journal entries or reflection paragraphs about what they have learned. They also learn election-related vocabulary.

Project #2: Community Mural

Area of Community Learning Teamwork Builds On Artifacts
Place-based learning. Students work in teams (or as a class) to conduct research, develop the theme of the mural, and to paint it Students also work together with local business owners and other community members.
  • Mural proposals and survey charts and graphs
  • Photos of the mural (process and finished product)
  • Reflection paragraphs

Setup

  1. With the support of local businesses, tell students that they’ve been hired to create murals all about their community!
  2. In teams (depending on the number of participating businesses) or as a class, students develop themes for their murals and plan out what they want to depict.
  3. Temporary murals can be painted with washable paint on business’ windows.

Research

  1. Invite an artist to class to speak about his or her work.
  2. Students can learn more about their community by exploring its features and researching its history online.
  3. They should also survey business owners and community members to find out what makes their community and its citizens special.

Communication

Students speak and listen to business owners and community members, write proposals for mural themes, present proposals and murals to the business owners and the community, and write reflection paragraphs on what they have learned.

Project #3: Neighborhood Clean Up

Area of Community Learning Teamwork Builds On Artifacts
Environment-based learning Students work together to plan the event (with teacher supervision and approval), and to create materials to write or advertise the event (e.g., press releases). Students also clean together.
  • Photos from the event
  • Research and presentations on the importance of keeping our communities clean
  • Reflection paragraphs

Setup

Bring the Clean Up mini-game in Xello K-2 to life by organizing a park or neighborhood cleanup day!

  1. Have students brainstorm ways to:
    • recruit volunteers (e.g., speaking to the local newspaper)
    • organize the cleanup (e.g.,dividing the park into manageable sectors)
    • obtain the supplies they’ll need
    • and raise money for future projects (e.g., bake sale or lemonade sale—garbage free, of course!).
  2. Students can also create presentations, drawings, skills, or materials to help educate everyone on keeping the community clean.

Research

  1. Students can use the computer to research the environmental impact that litter has on communities; they can also research what materials are recyclable in preparation for the cleanup.
  2. Students can visit the park or neighborhood in order to plan the event.
  3. They can survey their classmates, parents, and members of the community to see which park or area of their neighborhood needs the most attention.
  4. You can invite representatives from the local parks department to speak to the class.

Communication

Students write “press releases” about the event, listen to and speak to community members about the event, read about the environmental impact of trash in our parks, speak to local businesses to gather donations such as garbage bags and gloves, and write reflection paragraphs on what they have learned.

Project #4: Take Your Child to Work Day

Area of Community Learning Teamwork Builds On Artifacts
Work-based learning Students brainstorm possible questions together and create presentations in teams that illustrate the similarities and differences between classrooms and workplaces.
  • Take Your Child to Work Day reports and photos
  • Reflection paragraphs

Setup

  1. Have the class brainstorm some questions they have about people’s jobs. What do they want to know?
    • How did you get your job?
    • Do you have a boss?
    • What do you wear to work?
    • What kind of people do you work with?
    • When do you eat lunch?
  2. Encourage students to ask some of these question - and others - as they accompany their parent to work.
  3. After students give their presentations about their day, have a class vote to see which occupation they’d like to learn more about.
  4. Invite class speakers or arrange a follow-up field trip based on students’ interests.
  5. You can then ask students to compare and contrast the workplace to their classroom and deliver a team presentation on their observations.

Research

  1. Students can research occupations on the computer.
  2. You can invite community members in an occupation that interests students to the class and arrange a class visit to a workplace where students can learn more about a job that interests them.

Communication

Students speak to workers about their jobs, listen to students’ reports on how they spent Take Your Child to Work Day, deliver reports, speak and listen to class speakers and field trip experts, and write reflection paragraphs on how the classroom is like a workplace.

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